Jersey Zoo

Please note, this post is part of a series. Click here to read from the beginning.

I really struggled to decide if one, I wanted to visit Jersey Zooย and two, if I did go, I wanted to write this post about it. As a vegan, obviously I don’t agree with zoos as a form of entertainment where animals are kept in cages purely for the enjoyment of humans. Having said that I do understand that, mainly due to the actions of humans, many species are now threatened with extinction and there are people trying to prevent this. Had I visited Jersey alone, I probably wouldn’t have visited the zoo. I have a friend who is a keeper there, though, and she was keen to show me how they are working hard to improve situations worldwide for these animals. I think it is important to note here that the zoo is also known as the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. This isn’t a zoo in the traditional sense.

The zoo was funded by Gerald Durrell in 1959, and except for the meerkats, all the animals that live there are threatened with extinction. Like myself, and everyone who works at the zoo, Durrell would have much preferred to see all the animals in their natural habitats in the wild. His ultimate goal was that the zoo would close once all the animals received sufficient protection, but sadly that didn’t happen before his death in 1995 and still looks to be a long way off.

One again lucky to have our own personal guide who introduced us to lots of the other zoo keepers, we got to meet a lot of the animals close-up. These experiences are available to book at an extra charge through the Durrell website. If you’re happy to get stuck in shovelling animal dung and carrying heavy buckets, they also have volunteering opportunities.

It’s a surprise to a lot of people, as I’m vegan, but I’m actually not a big animal person. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t dislike animals and I obviously try not to exploit them in any way, but I’m happy to respect their space and leave them to their thing. I feel honoured to have met so many of the zoo’s inhabitants close-up, though, something I never thought I would get the chance to do. Nowadays, the zoo uses a hands off approach with the animals. Although they live in a zoo, they want them to have minimal contact with humans. Some of the older animals remember times before the new rules came into effect, though, and are quite curious about the humans who have come to see them. The keepers explained to us they are also working on techniques to avoid having to tranquillize the animals, for example, when they need medical treatment.

Is Jersey Zoo perfect? I think even the staff at the zoo would admit there’s lots more they could do. There are always enclosures that could be bigger, habitations that could be better or more natural and ways of doing things that result in less stress for the animals. What I experienced at the zoo was a team of people who want to achieve all this and more, because they genuinely care for the animals and love what they do. I completely understand if anyone feels visiting the zoo makes me not vegan somehow, but until we can fix bigger problems in the world that means all the animals can once again live free we need places like Jersey Zoo. So, here are some of my photos from our day at the zoo. We actually saw a lot more animals than the ones below, but I was limited by the poor capabilities of my camera. Much, much better photos than mine are available on their website.

 

 

 

 

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