Exploring Jersey by Car

Please note: this post is part of a series. Click here to read from the beginning.

DSC_0176

As there were five of us exploring Jersey together, we thought the best transport option was to hire a car. Driving in Jersey is very easy (they drive on the left side of the road, same as in the UK), especially if you’re used to driving in a British city like I am. The Channel Islands do have their own rules of the road, but they’re fairly logical and easy to work out. If you’re unable to drive, both Jersey and Guernsey have very good, cheap bus services. Two of our group live on Jersey, so we had the added bonus of personal guides as we navigated the island.

DSC_0092

20180520_203234

On the west coast of the island, in fact it pretty much is the west coast it’s so long, is St Ouen’s Bay. Five Mile Road runs almost the length of the beach, although neither the road or the beach (4 miles) is 5 miles long. The road got it’s name from the distance between the two furthest points in the bay. Or, as I heard one old lady comically call it in error, ‘8 mile road’. I wanted to correct her, but I felt it would take too long to explain 8 mile refers to something totally different. This is the place to come if you’re a surfer, and also the best place to watch the sunset.

DSC_0088DSC_0086DSC_0085

Almost at the northwest point of the island is Plémont Point, also known as La Grève au Lançon (Bay of Sand Eels), where we hiked along one of the many coastal paths. At low tide, more steep steps will take you down to Plémont Bay, but at high tide the beach completely disappears. This area has accessible caves that you can explore, although again be aware of tides. There is yet more evidence of the German occupation along the north coast. Plémont Guardhouse was originally built in the 19th century, and converted by the German Army into one of their reinforced field positions.

DSC_0176

Right over the other side of the island, on the east coast, we also visited Gorey. This is the home of Mont Orgueil, Jersey’s oldest castle. As a site that has been adopted and used by various groups over the years, the castle contains buildings from the early 13th century right up to the German occupation in 1940-45.

If you’re comfortable being on the left side of the road, driving in Jersey is a great way to see the island. It’s small enough to get around fairly quickly, and interesting enough to keep you occupied for as long as you want. If unlike us, you don’t know a local who can sit in the passenger seat and act as guide, I would recommend getting hold of a good travel guide so you know what you’re looking at.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s