Getting around in Dubai

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Please note, this post is part of a series. Click here to read from the beginning.

Dubai is very much a city designed for cars. Unlike a lot of places in the world, which see reducing their dependence on cars as progressive, in Dubai there is still a lot of status attached to owning your own set of wheels. To be able to visit all of the city, you will have to travel by car at some point. If you want to venture outside of the city and into the desert, access to a car is a must. The roads are big, more than six lanes each way in some places. The driving isn’t the best I’ve ever seen, nor is it the worst. And as making offensive signals or swearing at other people is illegal and punishable with imprisonment, at least road rage from other drivers is unlikely. I was lucky to always have other people driving me whilst I was there, so I didn’t have to concentrate too much on the road, but the network of highways and streets seemed very over-complicated. I couldn’t decide if this was intentional to make Dubai seem bigger than it is, or just a result of bad planning. Either way, driving is still the easiest way to get around Dubai. That being said, there are other options. If you are not able to drive yourself, there are lots of taxis available to transport you. You don’t even need to phone them. As it’s so unheard of to walk anywhere in Dubai (although possible and actually quite enjoyable in some places), as soon as you start walking anywhere on the street a taxi driver will stop and ask if you need a ride. It’s like some magic sixth sense they all have to let them know where the pedestrians are in the city. You can also use Uber, but the regular taxis are cheaper and just as efficient. Be prepared to get your own sat nav up on your phone, though, a few of the taxi drivers I encountered didn’t know where they were going and needed directions.

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If you don’t want to pay out for taxis and drivers all the time, there are public transport options in Dubai. The metro opened in 2010 with the red line that runs 52.1km through downtown and right up to the airport. The green line, which covers Bur Dubai and Deira, was added in 2011 and covers 22.5km. Although you are limited as to what you can access with the metro, it’s a very efficient service which I hope they will expand in the future. The regular carriages feel just like travelling on the underground in London, although here you are on an elevated track with good views of the city around you. The carriages can be just as crowded as in London, although you’re unlikely to get shoved and pushed as much because it’s also considered an offence. One Indian man accidentally touched my hand when we were holding onto the same pole, and looked petrified when he realised. He apologised profusely, but I assured him it was fine. As there has to be a VIP version of everything in Dubai, there is also the option to travel Gold Class. This is a separate carriage at the end of the train that has bigger seats and usually more space. It will cost you twice as much for the fare, but it’s still not expensive. The big advantage I found whilst travelling Gold Class, as recommended by my friend, is that you get a great view out of the front/back window. You can buy a top-up card at any of the metro stations, the staff are generally helpful and overall it’s an enjoyable transport system. There are also local buses and trams in Dubai, and although I didn’t hear of any problems with either network, I didn’t use them whilst I was there.

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By far my favourite form of transport in Dubai is also, apart from walking, the cheapest. For only 1 AED (about 20p) you can catch an abra across the Creek to Bur Duabi and Deira. It feels like there are hundreds of the little, motorised, traditional wooden boats waiting along the creekside to ferry people back and forth. They leave once full, about 20 passengers, and you find yourself bunched up with group of workers as you skim along almost at water level. It’s only a short journey, but one I would definitely recommend as something you have to experience in Dubai. You can also charter your own abra by the hour, although they’re so small I can’t imagine you can do much on them other than sit still and watch the views go by.

If you would like to see more of my travels on the public transport network in Dubai, including videos, please visit my Facebook page Sasieology.

 

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2 Replies to “Getting around in Dubai”

    1. It was definitely a fun way to travel! No, it doesn’t take long to fill up at all. When I was there they were leaving every 5 minutes.

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