Sasieology

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The 8 Principles of Planeat

Posted by Sas on October 29, 2012

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post explaining why I’m a plant-based vegetarian . As I mentioned in the post, my main inspiration was watching the Planeat movie. Following on from that, I thought I’d share with you Ann Esselstyn’s 8 principles of a plant-based diet and the impact they have had on my diet and lifestyle.

 

1. Eat Oats

Eat oats for breakfast every day. Oats help lower cholesterol and also reduce artery inflammation. When I first read Ann’s Principles, I was already eating oatbran for breakfast, so it was good to know that I was doing something right. Since I found out that I’m allergic to gluten, I’ve had to switch to buckwheat flakes, but I still eat them the same way. Personally, I like to heat the flakes up with half-water, half-soya milk and drizzle a bit of local honey or agave syrup over the top. It’s also a handy breakfast to prepare when you’re in a rush to get ready in the morning. I put the buckwheat on a low heat whilst I dash round my apartment finding my work clothes and packing my lunch. I only have to stir it a couple of times and, about ten minutes later, it’s ready to eat.

 

2. Eat Greens

Eat greens, especially leafy greens. That’s where you’re going to get all your nutrients from. Don’t worry if you’re not keen on complicated cooking, kale is super easy to prepare. Pull the leaves off the stalks and put them in a shallow pan (I use a frying pan) with about an inch of water in the bottom. Cover with a lid and steam for three minutes. They taste great on wholemeal bread with lemon or as a side to most meals.

 

3. Eat Beans and Lentils

Beans and lentils can be used as a replacement for meat and dairy, and they are really versatile. I keep a tub of red lentils in my kitchen and throw a handful into soups and stews when I’m cooking. Without wanting to sound like a stereotypical vegetarian, I’m going to talk about the merits of hummus. Over the years I’ve tried various types and brands of pre-packed hummus and, whilst it is perfectly edible, I’ve never been a huge fan. Inspired by Ann Esselstyn’s 8 Principles, I decided to give in another shot. You should, however, avoid hummus that contains tahini, and Ann has a great, simple recipe for making your own hummus. Blend together chick peas, lemon and garlic and add cumin, vinegar, red peppers, parsley or cilantro (coriander to us Brits) to taste. On a personal note, I don’t eat garlic, so instead I use chilli, which tastes great. My top tips are to boil the chick peas for a couple of minutes longer than the instructions tell you, or boil them at all if they’re ready cooked, for a smoother texture.

 

4. Eat Whole Grains

Whole grains are easy to identify, just make sure the word ‘whole’ is written before them on the packaging. Health food shops are a great place to find these. Holland and Barrett have stores in most towns and cities here in the UK.

 

5. Eliminate Oil

Ann urges everyone to empty all oil, even virgin olive oil, out of your cupboards. Instead any liquid works. Vegetable broth (no sodium), water, wine, beer, orange juice, carrot juice, vinegar are all viable alternatives. When I first read this I was dubious, but I have since tried using lots of different liquids including orange juice, vinegar and white wine vinegar and found that they do actually work. Most vegetables also contain enough liquid that they don’t need much else to cook them anyway. I never use oil at home anymore, and I try to avoid foods that contain a lot of oil when I eat out.

Coincidentally, whilst conducting my own experiments with alternatives to oil, I saw an episode of The Secret Millionaire on Channel 4 where the same thing was being done but for entirely different reasons. The secret millionaire in this particular episode was trying to fry a hamburger, and asked his neighbours if he could borrow some oil. They told him he didn’t need oil, and he could fry his burger using water. Theirs was a discovery borne out of necessity, as in such a poor neighbourhood oil was a luxury they could not afford. I found it interesting that in these economically challenging times, the cheapest option quite often also turns out to be the most environmentally friendly.

 

6. Drink Water

Water is the best drink you can have. You should drink at least 2 litres a day, more when you exercise, and wait 30 minutes between drinking and eating to avoid heartburn. What’s more, you’ve got to pay for water in your water rates anyway, so you save a fortune in all the other drinks you don’t buy.

 

7. Avoid Sugar and Salt

Avoid sugar and salt as much as possible. Use lemon juice, lime juice and hot sauces instead. If you are used to eating a lot of sugar and salt, you will crave it at first, but that will pass. If you want to treat yourself to something sweet, try agave syrup (plant-based) or honey.

 

8. Read Labels

Read the label on anything you eat that has a label and know what it is you’re eating. This has been a habit of mine since I first turned vegetarian, and I’ve learnt so much from it.

 

The people who brought us Planeat have also made another movie call Forks over Knives. Check out the website here.

 

 

 

 

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3 Responses to “The 8 Principles of Planeat”

  1. Herbifit said

    Some excellent advice there. If you cut out all oils where are you getting your fats from? I eat a plant based diet and find that without a little oil I get almost no fat in my diet. Other than that – I am with you 🙂 Especially on eating your greens. I try and find a way of putting as much green matter on every plate as I can. My favourite recipe at the moment is this http://herbifit.wordpress.com/2012/10/19/spanish-greens-and-rice/

    • Sas said

      I eat lots of nuts and seeds, cashew nuts are great for ‘good fats’. Avacados are good as well if you’re lucky enough to be somewhere that grows them. Thanks for the recipe tip 🙂

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